Writers are Courageous

I return from my long absence  from blogging to say I haven’t given up writing or this blog. At least not yet. At least not with unedited projects sitting on my hard drive. Or the countless half-baked stories floating in my head. Most writers like myself lead a relatively quiet life. And if you’re an introspective type such as myself you find yourself tuning into your rich inner world inside your head to escape the chaos of the outside world. However I had this running thought in my head since last year when I had this epiphany after writing a letter to government officials in Russia to rethink a decision to place a ban on Jehovah’s Witnesses in that country.

Writers are courageous.

However what makes writers courageous? Usually when we think of the word “courage” we think of synonyms such as brave or fearless. We often associate those terms to high risk or dangerous occupations that involves putting your life on the line as well as others. Good examples are firefighters, paramedics, and police officers just to name a few. It may seem absurd to class writers in that same category. While writers are not running into burning buildings or apprehending criminals, they’re courageous in their own way. Here’s why I think writers are courageous.

  1. It takes courage to follow your dreams. The act of writing a story takes a considerable amount of imagination, craft, and heart. You may have started with an idea, then visualized the characters of your story before that vision finally found it’s way on paper or your computer screen. As the story progresses it’s natural to become emotionally invested. Once you’ve neared completion you already poured your heart and soul into the story and now you’ve made the biggest decision to have the outside world read it. Will they accept it (editors/ readers)? Will they like? Can I actually sell this? These are factors you have no control over. Oftentimes our insecurities are the biggest hurdles to cause us to shrink back from taking that step. Coupled with negativity from family and friends, we may feel our story is not good enough or that writing is not a practical, worthwhile pursuit. It takes inner courage to push through our own insecurities and fears and take that plunge into the unknown.
  2. It take courage to deal with criticism. This one is probably the hardest for most writers. When you crafted your story it’s almost become your baby as some writers have likened their writing pieces. Now you’re offering that “baby” (which has all the sweat, tears, and heart you put into) to the outside world for judgement and you have no control how readers respond to your story. I don’t care what nobody says, deep down you want someone to like what your write. Nobody likes to hear their book/story sucks. Even if those very words aren’t used, we may take any criticism against our book as a personal attack. After all the story is a collection of your ideas and vision. Such fears are not unfounded as I’ve seen books I liked torn apart by reviewers on Amazon or Goodreads. It takes inner strength as a writer to not lash out and reply to a disgruntled reviewer. It takes strength to digest the good and the bad and not let it break your spirit but to grow from it. It takes strength to stay true to your vision even if few people get it.
  3. It takes courage to tackle deep subjects. If you’re writing a comedy or a happy-go-lucky children’s book this may not apply to you. Unless your writing something like a satire. But if your writing books, or even essays or letters that touch on sensitive, hard-hitting, controversial subject matters this can be particularly challenging. Again this is similar to point #2 because you don’t know how people will take it. Will you be able to convey your message or will it be lost on your listeners because they got offended or they couldn’t process the information. After all you want your intended message to be heard and understood by your listener. You also want them to think critically about the issues at hand and if it’s your intention move them to action. Even if the message gets lost in translation or worse upsets some readers in the process, having the guts to stand by your words take courage whether you’re writing to readers or powerful government officials.

I used to worry about how well my book would be received or not getting reviews. For writer’s dismayed they’re not on the best-seller’s list or their writing hasn’t been picked up for a movie deal just know there are perks and downsides to increased notoriety. With increased exposure,  this opens your book to new readers from vast backgrounds and viewpoints. This opens you to all opinions, good and bad. But as a writer that’s something you have to mentally prepare for and being willing to accept getting into this business.

Frankly though I never wanted to be famous. For me it was never about becoming famous. It was simply sharing my story for others to read and enjoy. It was a courageous act to put in the hard work to follow-through with the self-publishing process, and to put myself out there for others to judge you. This is all in the quest to make readers get lost in the world I created. Make them feel something. Inspire. Granted most of are not heroes. Writing alone doesn’t give us that designation. But we should never forget the power behind our words. There are books that have literally changed lives for the better. There are books to this day that have forever changed how I viewed the world. I would have never known some of the things I learned now if those writers kept their writings to themselves. Yes using writing as a platform to convey a message, inspire, and move others to action is a powerful thing. Never forget that words are powerful and so do the writers that pen them. So choose your words carefully.

 

 

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